ISB News

Baliga Lab: A Global Map To Fight Tuberculosis

3 Bullets:

  • The disease progression of tuberculosis is extremely complex and it’s poorly understood.
  • ISB and Seattle BioMed researchers have made an important step by developing a comprehensive map of gene regulation in tuberculosis.
  • A resulting open-access web portal offers any scientist the ability to mine the collected data.

By ISBUSA

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a top global health threat due to its remarkable complexity in disease progression. To help understand these complexities, researchers from Institute for Systems Biology and Seattle BioMed have developed the most comprehensive map to date of gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). It’s the first systems-scale construction of transcription factor (TF) binding sites and their regulatory target proteins in MTB. This study was published on March 31, 2015, in Nature Scientific Data.

Title: A comprehensive map of genome-wide gene regulation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Journal: Nature Scientific Data
Authors: Serdar Turkarslan, Eliza J. R. Peterson, Tige R. Rustad, Kyle J. Minch, David J. Reiss, Robert Morrison, Shuyi Ma, Nathan D. Price, David R. Sherman & Nitin S. Baliga
Link: Nature Scientific Data
Related research:
>Pushing the molecular switches of tuberculosis into overdrive to map interactions
>Uncovering the genetic adaptability of tuberculosis

The study involved systematic mapping of TF binding sites for more than 80 percent of all TFs in MTB genome, as well as classifying more than 9,000 changes associated with these TFs. The team also performed a comparative analysis of the two large datasets that were mapped and linked an additional 1,500 binding events to proximal gene regulation. In addition, the researchers integrated these datasets with independent regulatory network model to rigorously map networks of gene regulation in MTB.

The team developed the open-access MTB Network Portal to ensure integration of these datasets with existing data, analyses and other tools and eventual dissemination to the broader scientific community. Given the complexity of tuberculosis, this platform will provide a unified environment for integrated data mining for the larger MTB research community.

Recent Articles

  • Valerie Logan Luncheon emcee Heather Logan

    ‘Innovation to Impact:’ 8th Annual Valerie Logan Luncheon Shines Light on ISB Education

    The 8th Annual Valerie Logan Luncheon celebrated ISB Education’s mission of engaging entire school systems — from principals and administrators to teachers and students — to ensure all students are STEM literate. Nearly 100 people attended the event at ISB, and generously gave more than $100,000 for ISB Education.

  • Malaria Researchers’ Findings May Have Implications for Preventing Spread of Deadly Disease

    ISB researchers and their collaborators are using systems biology approaches to learn how the malaria parasite is able to transfer to humans via the bite of an infected mosquito. The information they have uncovered may help identify new ways to prevent people from contracting the deadly disease.

  • ISB Unveils New Brand Ahead of 20th Anniversary

    We created a new brand identity — including logo and tag line — to reflect ISB’s evolution since our inception in 2000, and ahead of our 20th anniversary. ISB is proud to be a part of the vibrant research community in Seattle, and is committed to translational and collaborative science.