ISB News

Cancer Genomics Cloud: ISB and Google Featured in MIT Tech Review

ISB Recieves $6.5M NIH Contract to Create Cancer Genomics Cloud with Google and SRA International (Image credit: MIT Tech Review)

(Above illustration from MIT Technology Review.)

MIT Technology Review published an article about the launch of Google Genomics and included a mention of ISB’s new Cancer Genomics Cloud project. ISB received an up-to $6.5 million, two-year NIH contract in collaboration with Google and SRA International.

From the MIT Technology Review article:

The idea is to create “cancer genome clouds” where scientists can share information and quickly run virtual experiments as easily as a Web search, says Sheila Reynolds, a research scientist at the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle. “Not everyone has the ability to download a petabyte of data, or has the computing power to work on it,” she says.

This article also was cited in The Scientist here.

Researchers interested in participating in the Cancer Genomics Cloud project, please visit cgc.isbscience.net.

Read more about ISB’s Cancer Genomics Cloud project:

cancerGenomicsCloud

 

Recent Articles

  • Genetic Switch May Predict Diatom Resilience in Acidified Oceans

    Researchers from ISB’s Baliga Lab recently published a paper in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science, in which they identified a diatom-specific gene that may play a key role in predicting when diatoms might transition from a low/moderate to a high carbon dioxide environment.

  • Dr. Temple Grandin and the Importance of Getting Kids Outside

    Dr. Temple Grandin was the featured guest of the latest ISB-Town Hall Seattle Science Series. Grandin discussed her new book – “The Outdoor Scientist: The Wonder of Observing the Natural World” – and a variety of other topics. Following her talk, she joined ISB President Dr. Jim Heath for a wide ranging Q&A discussion.

  • Coral: Healthy and Bleached

    ISB Researchers Among World-Class Experts Targeting Coral Bleaching

    ISB Drs. Jacob Valenzuela and Nitin Baliga are working to answer key questions about how climate change is affecting marine life and food supplies. The Paul G. Allen Family Foundation announced a $4 million grant over three years to support efforts aimed to help coral reefs survive the impacts of climate change.