ISB News

Project Feed 1010 Partners with Northeastern University to Advance Sustainable Agriculture

ISB’s Project Feed 1010 is building a global, crowd-sourced network of educators, students, researchers and farmers to optimize and scale-up sustainable agriculture practices and educate the future scientific workforce. To support this global network, we have partnered with Northeastern University to develop database, web and mobile infrastructures with functionalities for data tracking, monitoring, analytics and predictive modeling. For the next 10 weeks, more than 20 graduate-level computer science students will be actively engaging with ISB researchers to develop critical components of this infrastructure. The fast-paced and interactive course, which is structured like a start-up company, is designed so that students work as part of a programming team to integrate academic concepts and practical design experience. The goal is to have students reflect and analyze their work through beta testing and produce a significant demonstrable outcome in the form of an innovative working software system. Students will be working on Web, iOS and Android apps to develop advanced data analytics systems, engineer user interfaces, implement light sensors,build social networking components and incorporate data visualization. At the end of the course, the apps will be distributed to our network of educators, students, and farmers, allowing them to connect with Project Feed 1010’s global sustainable agriculture hub.

Learn more about Project Feed 1010.

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