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Dr. Lee Hood Receives Research!America Award

Dr. Lee Hood received the Geoffrey Beene Builders of Science Award from Research!America at a ceremony on March 12, 2014, in Washington D.C.

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Thompson and Mara Hutton, of the Geoffrey Beene Foundation, presented Dr. Lee Hood with the Geoffrey Beene Builders of Science Award.

From the Research!America Website for the Advocacy Awards (link):

Geoffrey Beene Builders of Science Award (Benefactor: The Geoffrey Beene Foundation)

Leroy Hood, MD, PhD, will be honored with Research!America’s 2014 Geoffrey Beene Builders of Science Award for pioneering the development of instruments that paved the way for the successful mapping of the human genome. He was one of a small number of early and persistent advocates for the Human Genome Project. Prior to Dr. Hood’s invention of the automated DNA sequencer, it took 30 years to sequence the genome of the cold virus, and the first gene cost $180 million to sequence. With Dr. Hood’s remarkable achievement, it took less than a day to sequence the genome of the SARS virus and the cost of sequencing a gene is now just $6. A true scientific pioneer, Dr. Hood is credited with the development of the discipline of systems biology, which introduced the revolutionary concept to understand not only each biological network but also how the networks function together. This idea is now taught in many college and high school programs. Dr. Hood received the National Medal of Science from President Barack Obama at the White House in 2013, one of the highest scientific achievements.

Watch Dr. Hood’s acceptance speech:

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