ISB News

Spotlight: Ayodale Braimah, Undergraduate Intern

Congratulations to Ayodale Braimah, an undergraduate intern in the Baliga Lab, who has just been accepted into the medical school at the University of Kansas. Ayodale has been studying microbiology at the University of Washington and sought a position in the Baliga Lab in order to immerse himself in an authentic research experience in microbiology and molecular biology. He specifically wanted to better understand how organisms adapt to new environments. His initiative ended up being ISB’s gain. For the past year, he has been an invaluable member of the research team, always working with a smile and stepping up to take on multiple projects investigating microorganisms and syntrophic communities. His can-do attitude and willingness to share his knowledge with others undoubtedly contributed to his successful application to medical school.

“Although I had no prior research lab experience, Dr. Baliga and his lab took me in and trained me in an array of techniques that I would never have been able to learn in a classroom setting,” Ayodale said. “I had the opportunity to be mentored by experienced scientists such as Serdar (Turkarslan) and Nina (Arens), as well as attend different seminars during my time at ISB. As a result, I not only grew as a scientist but picked up many professional skills along the way. Being at ISB has taught me many essential lessons such as the importance of collaboration in science and has also allowed me to critically think in new ways. I will take these lessons with me as I leave to attend medical school at the University of Kansas. I will be endlessly thankful for the ways I was encouraged, supported, cheered-on by every member of the Baliga Lab and ISB as a whole.”

Thank you, Ayodale, and best of luck!

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