ISB News

Earth To Dinner 2 at Seattle Culinary Academy

ISB participated in Earth To Dinner 2 on Jan. 12 at Seattle Culinary Academy. This was a follow-up event for the Dec. 12 Earth to Dinner event at ISB. (Read more…)

The theme was sustainable food/agriculture and urban design. Panelists for the evening included:

Grace Kim: Architect and co-founder of Schemata Workshop
Liz Fikejs: Conservation Program Manager, Seattle Public Utilities
Jessica Day: Project Manager, Project Feed 1010
Dean DeCrease: Principal of Festivore Design Works and Chief Governing Officer & Board Chair, Central Co-Op
Julia Sanders: Deputy Director, Global Ocean Health

Watch the Facebook Live video:

About Earth To Dinner: In December 2015, 195 global leaders came together to adopt the historic Paris Agreement – the world’s first comprehensive climate agreement. GOOD, in partnership with the #EarthTo coalition (100+ partners strong), has created the #EarthToDinner (earthtodinner.org) climate conversation dinner series to keep climate action on the table.

Recent Articles

  • Tackling Lyme Disease with Immunity

    It’s Lyme disease season in many areas of the United States, including the Northeast, the Midwest, and some places on the West Coast. In our latest Research Roundtable event, ISB Associate Professor Dr. Naeha Subramanian discussed the latest Lyme disease research conducted in her lab.

  • Wei Lab

    New Technology Reveals Single Cancer Cells Have Different Appetites for Fatty Acids

    A recently developed method by the Wei Lab at Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) and University of California, Riverside provides new insights into cancer biology by allowing researchers to show how fatty acids are absorbed by single cells. This work was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

  • Glioblastoma tumor slice and corresponding density map

    Looking at Tumors Through a New Lens

    To improve the efficacy of neoadjuvant immune checkpoint blockade against glioblastoma, researchers are looking for vulnerabilities in surgically removed tissues – a difficulty due to the vast differences within the tumor and between patients. To address this, ISB researchers and their collaborators developed a new way to study tumors.