ISB News

Register Now: ISB’s International Symposium

14th Annual International Symposium
April 6 and 7, 2015
Institute for Systems Biology

The Institute for Systems Biology’s Annual International Symposium, since its inception in 2002, has become a bellwether of new systems approaches across disciplines in the life sciences. The theme for 2015 is “Tipping Points in Medicine & Ecology” which is aligned with ISB’s focus on personalized medicine and environmental sustainability. The principles of critical phase transitions, early warning signs and, more generally, complex systems dynamics, offer a theoretical framework and analysis tools for understanding and predicting major state transitions in human health and in ecosystems. The Symposium aims to facilitate the translation of these theoretical principles to medicine and ecology. We hope you will join us for a lively exchange of ideas.

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Recent Articles

  • Sean Gibbons

    Metabolomics Reveals Connection Between Gut Microbiome and Blood

    Alpha diversity in the gut microbiome holds many clues to understanding human health. This blog post by Metabolon details how those clues are more accessible because ISB researchers can predict the diversity of an individual’s gut microbiome by examining metabolites in the blood. These findings were recently published in the journal Nature Biotechnology.

  • soldier

    ISB Researchers Seek a Better Way to Identify Chronic Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) has been a frequent injury among U.S. combatants, and blast-related mTBI has been called the “signature injury” from military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. ISB researchers are working to develop new methods to identify molecular changes in the blood of war veterans diagnosed with chronic mTBI.

  • Dr. Christian Diener, postdoc in ISB's Gibbons Lab.

    New Modeling Tool Allows Microbiome Researchers to Map Community Ecology to Ecosystem Function

    A promising new open-source metabolic modeling tool provides microbiome researchers a path forward in predicting ecosystem function from community structure. News of the software package, called MICOM, was developed in part by researchers in ISB’s Gibbons Lab, and its uses were published in the journal mSystems.