Welcome to the PNW Consortium

RECOVER
Study

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recover

Help us better understand the long-term effects of COVID.

If you or someone in your family has had COVID, or are feeling the long term effects of COVID, you might be able to help us understand more about it and treat it. Even if you have not had COVID, you might be able to help.

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About the PNW Consortium

As part of a massive nationwide effort to understand long COVID, Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) is leading a multi-site consortium as part of RECOVER. The regional consortium is made up of ISB, University of Washington, Swedish Medical Center and Providence — with more study sites coming soon.

ISB
UW
Swedish
Providence
Cedars Sinai

RECOVER: Researching COVID to Enhance Recovery

We're part of a nationwide study to support research on the long-term effects of COVID-19.

RECOVER, a research initiative from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), seeks to understand, prevent, and treat PASC, including Long COVID. PASC stands for post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 and is a term scientists are using to study the potential consequences of a SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Taking a united approach toward recovery

Together we can learn more. The more voices contributing to the RECOVER Initiative, the more meaningful and inclusive the answers will be to understanding, treating, and preventing the long-term effects of COVID.


The PNW Consortium is part of a national effort that brings together scientists, clinicians, patients, and caregivers to take on a critical problem: recovery from the long-term effects of COVID.

Progress takes people like you.

Learning comes from listening. The scientists and health professionals involved in RECOVER research are committed to engaging people whose health is adversely affected by this virus.

COVID-19 has affected millions. While many people are suffering, racial and ethnic minority groups have been hit the hardest. The RECOVER Initiative is inclusive by design and will involve a pool of tens of thousands of participants across multiple cohorts.

Am I Eligible?

If you are 18 years of age or older, you may be eligible.


Find out if I'm eligible
Risk for COVID-19 Hospitalization by Race/Ethnicity Compared to White, Non-Hispanic Persons
recover stats

Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

What is PASC?

SARS-CoV-2 is a virus that can infect the body and is referred to as a SARS-CoV-2 infection. Recovery from SARS-CoV-2 infection can vary from person to person:

PASC figure

Acute Infection:

Most people recover quickly from acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. People with acute infection report symptoms ranging from mild to severe. In some cases, this is diagnosed as COVID-19. Other people don't experience any symptoms of infection. But people who don’t experience symptoms also can be diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

Post-acute Experiences, including Long COVID:

Most people recover quickly from acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. People with acute infection report symptoms ranging from mild to severe. In some cases, this is diagnosed as COVID-19.

Other people don't experience any symptoms of infection. But people who don’t experience symptoms also can be diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

bracket

PASC:

Together, these and other health effects of the virus are called post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection, or PASC. PASC refers to what happens after the acute infection with the virus and is relevant whether a person has been diagnosed with COVID-19 or not. Even if someone did not experience symptoms, PASC is still relevant because there could be effects after acute infection.

Research in the News

Important research findings by an ISB-led collaborative group detail four factors that can be predictive of PASC at the initial point of COVID-19 diagnosis. This work was recently published online by the journal Cell, and has received a tremendous amount of press coverage, including this story by the New York Times.

RECOVER: What are we trying to learn?

What does recovery from SARS-CoV-2 infection look like among different groups?


How many people develop new symptoms after acute infection?


Why do some people develop these health effects while others do not?


How many people continue to have symptoms after acute infection?


What causes these health effects?


Does SARS-CoV-2 infection trigger changes in the body that increase the risk of other conditions, such as chronic lung, heart, or brain disorders?