ISB News

Tom Massey and his daughter, Alexis.

ISB Symposium: Not Just for Grownups

by Tom Massey How do you keep a 12 year old who learned Arabic in fourth grade “because it sounds exotic” engaged? That question has kept me and my wife on a circuitous journey to educate our daughter, Alexis. Our basic philosophy is to anchor her to a stable core of a few activities while having a continuous stream of “new things” in her orbit. Once every few years, a…

Arab Spring for Biology? Choose Open Access

This weekend, Burak Kutlu, one of our research scientists in the Hood Lab, is attending the Sage Bionetworks Commons Congress in San Francisco. The Congress will focus on "Building Better Models of Disease Together: Moving beyond the current medical information system and its rewards." He was selected as an outstanding Young Investigator. Here's his statement on why open access is important: "The economics performing open science is not well defined. One of the reasons that…

ISB Receives LEED Platinum Certification for Green Design

We are happy to announce that ISB has received LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum certification, the highest designation from the U.S. Green Building Council, which offers independent, third-party verification that a building was designed with the highest standards regarding human and environmental health. LEED measures an organizations achievements in sustainbility, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, indoor environmental quality and other criteria.

Dr. Leroy Hood Talks P4 at Inova Fairfax Hospital

Dr. Leroy Hood spoke at Inova Fairfox Hospital in Falls Church, Virginia, on March 27. His talk focused on P4 medicine. The Washington Business Journal covered the event. The following video is courtesy of Inova.  

Watch Cracking Your Genetic Code on PBS. See more from NOVA.

Lee Hood Talks Actionable Genes in NOVA’s ‘Cracking Your Genetic Code’

If you missed the NOVA special "Cracking Your Genetic Code" you can watch it here. Our president, Lee Hood, was among the experts featured in the documentary.

Genome Ethics

By Chris Witwer The Health and Human Service human research regulations are being revised. Scientists' input on whole genome sequencing data may shape the future of research. It's great that the article below says that change is "imminent." Here's an article that describes the issue: DNA Mapped in a Day Prompts U.S. Review of Genome Ethics And here's a document from the Department of Health and Human Services: https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2012-07329.pdf The…

Watch Cracking Your Genetic Code Preview on PBS. See more from NOVA.

Lee Hood on NOVA on March 28

We are eager to watch the NOVA documentary tonight on PBS called "Cracking Your Genetic Code." Lee Hood is one of the featured experts. The producer, Sarah Holt, began with a series of phone interviews late last summer before interviewing Lee on camera in her Boston studio. Here's a preview radio segment on the Emily Rooney Show that features Holt and Dr. Rudy Tanzi, who also appears in the documentary….

PopSci Future of: Preventive Medicine

This video from 2009 is a fun one of Dr. Leroy Hood's appearance on the Science Channel's "PopSci's Future of" show. It explains in simple terms why our researchers are looking for protein biomarkers, which offer the earliest signs of disease.

Our Genomes, Our Selves: The hunt for a disease gene

By Lee Rowen Every once in a while, different components of a research problem come together at just the right time. One lives for, and savors, these occasions. One of my favorite examples is the discovery of the genetic variant that causes hereditary pancreatitis. Hereditary pancreatitis (HP) causes painful attacks of the gut, often beginning in childhood. Over time, the pain and damage can become chronic and there is an…

New York Times Story About Gates Foundation Office Design Resonates

This article by Larry Cheek in the March 18, 2012, New York Times describes the trend of creating open office spaces to encourage creativity, movement and collaboration. The idea is that people need different types of spaces to allow for the full potential of different kinds of work. A one-size-fits-all philosophy doesn't function in this day and age when technology and customer service – and healthcare and science where ISB is concerned…

SXSW Healthcare Track Raises Question About Tech Tipping Point

This morning, one of our researchers who's working parttime to develop pilot projects related to personalized medicine for the P4 Medicine Institute (P4MI) shared an update. Among the challenges of launching a pilot project is getting individuals and, especially, families to collect biometric data over time. This involves a willingness from participants not only to record all this data but share it in the cloud, which raises questions about security…

Personalized Medicine: From Bench to Clinic

Our president, Dr. Leroy Hood, is featured in this Genome Technology article about the challenges of moving personalized medicine into the clinic. (The cover image features Dr. Eric Topol, who recently published a book called "The Creative Destruction of Medicine.")

Medicine 2.0: A Digital You

Dr. Eric Topol was a guest on KUOW/NPR this morning to discuss his new book "The Creative Destruction of Medicine" which talks about how the digital revolution can dramatically change healthcare and the practice of medicine. When we talk about P4 Medicine, we encourage people to understand – and embrace – the technology that's already available and the promise of a future when doctors will know exact data about your…

Quantified Health: For Control Freaks or Is It the Future?

We've all heard the advice that we have to be our own advocates when it comes to healthcare. Larry Smarr (and other "self-quanters") has taken that to the Nth degree by collecting as much biological data about his body and using the information to improve his health. This feature article in MIT's Technology Review is a great read about Smarr's experience as The Patient of the Future. Smarr will be…

All Hope is Not Lost for Better Healthcare

By Jeremy Johnson I used to feel a hopelessness about modern healthcare. We would talk in circles about how some people would get the care they needed, others would not, and that was the way of the world. Being what the insurance company calls a “young and healthy,” I had the luxury of watching the game unfold, but I didn’t have anything personal at stake. Then, a few Novembers back,…

Questions From Our Young Scientists to Obama

Recently, the White House posted a call for questions, which the President would then answer via Google Plus Hangout. Three of our young researchers submitted video questions to the White House YouTube page. Check out the videos:

Our Genomes, Our Selves

By Lee Rowen In February of 2001 I headed off to Washington DC to participate in an extravagant celebration of scientific achievement. Preliminary drafts of the human genome’s DNA sequence were being published in Nature and Science magazines, and those of us who’d spent years immersed in the Human Genome Project were ready to exult, for one precious weekend, before spending yet more years finishing the sequence to high quality….

Does Being a Compliance Manager Make Me the Bad Guy?

By Chris Witwer Nature.com recently published an article about research misconduct at a Chinese research institution. Dr. Mu-ming Poo, Director of the Institute of Neuroscience in Shanghai, is quoted saying, “Very few people in the funding agency or in the scientific community are willing to be the 'bad guy' and enforce the regulations.” Wait! Bad guy? That’s what I do for a living – enforce the regulations! Am I a bad…