ISB News

Greater Good: Successful High School Interns

2013 High School Interns

Every summer, ISB welcomes a group of high school interns, hosted through our Systems Education Experiences program. ISB is proud of its collaborative and cross-disciplinary culture and we work hard to nurture an environment that allows our staff to achieve at a high level. It was especially gratifying to get this comment from one of our interns, who had just completed her time here:

“At ISB, I witnessed collaboration that was very intentional and reciprocal. I think this is based on two fundamental concepts. Firstly, everyone seems to have a good understanding of their own strengths and skills, as well as those of all their colleagues. Knowing what other individuals specialize in gives people direct access to tools and knowledge that they themselves are not as familiar with. Secondly, I saw a unity at ISB that pushes scientists and other employees towards common goals of furthering scientific knowledge and benefitting humanity and the environment through biological innovations and findings. With that said, helping others with their projects and challenges ultimately gets the scientific community closer to achieving these goals, so people seemed excited to contribute to a variety of tasks even if they were not their own.”

Recent Articles

  • Reich, Heath on Vaccines

    Dr. Jennifer Reich Talks Vaccines and COVID In ISB-Town Hall Seattle Livestream

    Sociologist Dr. Jennifer Reich, author of “Calling the Shots,” was the featured speaker of a virtual event hosted by ISB and Town Hall Seattle. She discussed the complex and increasingly political world of vaccines, how vaccines are viewed as a personal consumption product vs. a public health solution, COVID-19 vaccine development, and more.

  • Keystone Taxa Indispensable for Microbiome Recovery

    How can we harness successional ecology to quickly repair antibiotic-damaged gut microbiota? ISB Assistant Professor Dr. Sean Gibbons wrote this commentary for the journal Nature Microbiology detailing recent research that answers that question. Click the link to read the story (link will open as a new window). Illustration by Allison Kudla, PhD / ISB. 

  • Illustration depicting an individual's genetic risk for disease being "reflected."

    ISB Researchers Show Genetic Risk for Disease Often Reflected in Our Blood

    Diseases develop gradually over years, sometimes decades, before symptoms appear, and are due to malfunctioning physiological processes brought about by our genes and environment. In research published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), ISB researchers have shown how an individual’s genetic risk for disease is often reflected in their blood.